Pharaoh’s Principles: Navigating Worlds

world

  • the earth, together with all of its countries, peoples, and natural features.
  • all of the people, societies, and institutions on the earth.
  • denoting one of the most important or influential people or things of its class.
  • another planet like the earth
  • the material universe or all that exists; everything
  • a part or aspect of human life or of the natural features of the earth, in particular.
  • a part or aspect of human life or of the natural features of the earth, in particular.
  • a region or group of countries.
  • a period of history.a group of living things.
  • the people, places, and activities to do with a particular thing.
  • average, respectable, or fashionable people or their customs or opinions.
  • a person’s life and activities.
  • everything that exists outside oneself.
  • a stage of human life, either mortal or after death.
  • secular interests and affairs.

One word, but so many definitions to consider. That’s how a world works. You may be living in at least three worlds at one time. You can be in the world we call Earth, in which it is governed by universal rules. Then you have a world where you’re living in a local environment and society is according to that place. Add on your viewpoints based on factors such as upbringing, dramatic events, ethnicity, medical condition, etc. Add all those and you’ll have multiple worlds that may collide with each other at one point in time.

I’m writing about worlds for two reasons. The primary reason is that I’m starting my non-fiction book and the introduction will focus on how people can live in worlds within a world, based on circumstances and beliefs. Additionally, I want to show people that not everyone can fit into another person’s world. The second reason behind the post is my own personal viewpoints on living in multiple realities.

You see, I think that people on the autistic spectrum get ridiculed a lot for not understanding the neurotypical world. Sure, we may not get social cues or expectations on how to survive in the NT world. And their world may be scary due to triggers that aggravate over-stimulated senses. But we can say the same thing to NTs about not understanding OUR world. For instance, I can blog all day about people not understanding why I choose to talk about societal topics more than reality TV shows. I can lament about NTs’ failure to understand my thoughts without expecting me to communicate through feelings (I normally rely on events, facts, and tangible things to convey my points, not societal norms or complex emotions).

At the end of the day, and in any group on Earth, people aren’t meant to convince others to accept a particular way of life or thinking. Otherwise, we would argue about how to each a sandwich “correctly”, which varies from person to person. It would bore people and maybe even cause unnecessary conflict. If more people want to understand autistic people, then would it be better if more people can stop and explore the aspie world in depth? Matter of fact, don’t just limit it to just understanding aspies. Try applying this rule to any one you may not be familiar with. The more you listen and understand another world, the more giving and respectful you’ll be to that person. You might even begin to change perspectives on how you interact with things and people with in your own world.

Practicals:

  • Never preach to a person if your opinions differ from those of the person you’re interacting with. Give wisdom after looking into his or her world first. Also allow the person to explain the viewpoint(s) in question.
  • Research the aspects of a person’s life. In my case, I would appreciate it if you can ask my inner circle about how autism affects me. Reading credible books on my condition helps too.

Otherwise, that’s all I have for looking at different worlds…for now. Heheheh. No worries, I’ll be more in depth once I finish the introduction to my upcoming book.

Pharaoh’s Principles #2: Anime/Cosplay FB Group Trolling

Pharaoh’s Principle #1: Toni Braxton’s Former View on Autism

 

Good evening everyone!! After months on hiatus and a messy end to Abilities of the Arts (my project that I helped grow for a year), Pharaoh’s Principle has returned. I will be doing this weekly for now on.

Before I go on, please read the following articles on Toni Braxton’s former view on how her son became autistic and the Christian response to it

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/24/toni-braxton-autism-son_n_5385477.html

http://guardianlv.com/2014/05/toni-braxton-says-sons-autism-is-gods-judgment-for-previous-abortion/

Braxton’s comment hits home to me in two ways. Though I’m spiritual and don’t like to prefer a religion over another, I’m strongly influenced by Christian beliefs. I’m also autistic myself; I was diagnosed at age 2 1/2. Both can be polarizing topics to talk about, since they are some controversial undertones to it. Autism and its role in the church is one of them.

I will give Ms. Braxton the benefit of the doubt. She mentioned that Diezel’s autism was God’s punishment for aborting a child before her second son came into the picture. But according to the Huffington Post, she has since changed her viewpoints. Braxton admits that her son is “is special and learns in a different way.”

As long as she learning that autism is not a curse, then I’m cool with her expressing her prior guilt in her memoir. Also, I understand her initial concerns because my family had that similar reaction when they first found out that I am autistic.  My father probably didn’t know how to approach me at first or was wondering if I would ever be the All-American son who can drive, play sports, and get married. I’m pretty sure that my mother would’ve hypothesized that my autism was a result of her past mistakes she thought she made. I can’t make further speculations because I didn’t comprehend either one of their thoughts back then, but I know that they were scared one way or another. But like Braxton, they don’t immediately go for the autism label. To them, I’m their proud, artsy son who loves his sports, social topics, cartoons, and adventures.

At first, I hated Braxton’s admission. It sounded like how the congregation can sometimes see my autism, as an impediment or curse from the deities. Yet I backed off after seeing that she was referring to the initial diagnosis, not a continuing belief.

However, I do want to pray for those who continue to think that autism is sin or punishment from God. And sadly, it’s not new. From the beginning, some linked any disability to the fault of the family or some kind of curse. It was brought up in the Bible, when Jesus’ disciples asked if a man’s blindness was a result of his parents’ sin. He replied:

“Neither this man nor his parents sinned, said Jesus, but this happened so that the works of God might be displayed in his life” (John 9:2–3).

From what I read and know in my own life, autism happened so that God can work through people on the spectrum. It also happened so that God can inspire people to do God-pleasing works, no matter what condition you have or background you’re from. I believed that God worked through people like Temple Grandin, Anthony Ianni, Jason McElwain, Donna Williams, Blind Tom, Stephen Wiltshire, and even 50 Tyson (though we can question his lyrical content and delivery). And perhaps Ms. Braxton is slowly realizing that her Lord his working through Diezel to become a great person in the future.

Furthermore, the higher powers may be working on your child to grow into a great leader too. It takes believing in his or her abilities though, not focusing on the “negatives” of autism.

MomoCon 2014 Review

My two cents on Momocon 2014 pros and suggested improvements, with brief shout-out to two newly weds.

DISCLAIMER: I do not own the rights to the MLP logo, Heaven’s Lost Property logo, and Flii Stylz & Tenashus’ “Break It On Down”

SN: Sorry if most of my face is dark

Latest Happenings w/ Pharaoh

Back to vlogging. It’s been a while, so I decided to give y’all updates on some stuff in my life.

SN: Thank you all for the love and support, especially over the last year.

Also…be on the lookout for the return of Pharaoh’s Principles

Timotheus Gordon Jr.: MFA in Writing from SCAD-Atlanta

Good afternoon everyone!! A few weeks ago I’ve finally gotten my MFA degree after defending my thesis. It was a rough road, but I’ve made it. Thank you Lord!

Thank you all for the love and support throughout the process of getting my thesis together.

You can see my full thesis below. Feel free to read and comment on it. ;)

Gordon_Jr_Timotheus_Autism_As_A_Superpower_WRIT_Winter+2014

Otherwise, enjoy your day and the second day of Spring.

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Hidden Layers to Bullygate: Mental Health in the NFL

Folks, Bullygate is worst than I expected. It’s not about bullying, being black, and the hazing culture anymore. The alarming issue that I took away is the teams’ and the league’s ability to handle mental health maladies among players.

Feel free to read the full Wells report and make your own judgments afterwards. From what I read, however, I don’t think teammates were prepared to handle Jonathan Martin’s mental health issues, especially since some of the players constantly taunt J-Mart. The front office and coaching staff seemed to turn the other way as well. Even an assistant coach joined in on taunting the assistant trainer, and who knows, he might have picked on J-Mart behind his back too.

Today, when we have have issues, we are recommended to go seek professional help. We talk to somebody about our problems. We do yoga or exercises or meditation sessions to clear our minds. We pray to high powers.

At least that’s what the workplace is teaching us to do for the most part. We may live in the 21st century, but the way NFL players deal with mental health issues is as archaic as how we used to travel 150 years ago. I never played a down in the NFL and college, but I played organized sports before. In some locker rooms, crying to people about your problems is a “bitch ass move.” It’s socially unacceptable to break down and cry. Either you toughen up and keep your problems to yourself or quit. To the Miami Dolphins, Martin is a punk because he chose to leave instead of confronting the situation head-on. Also, if you’re picked on, the unwritten locker room rule is: defend yourself, or else, quit.

I don’t know if that’s an healthy environment for players who prefer seeking help and alternative means of handling mental issues. No wonder why some players are beginning to dislike the NFL. You can feel alone, even in a team setting, if you’re different from the “typical, social” player and don’t respond as well to certain situations as other players.

I would love to dig in the matter further, because it’s intertwined with other societal topics, such as racism and classism. But even as write this brief blog, I think the report itself convinced me to speak out.

And this have even more scary possibilities. If NFL teams are inadequate in dealing with mental health issues, then how they will handle players with developmental disabilities, such as autism and Down’s Syndrome? I would like like to write about Bullygate’s potential impact on autistic people seeking to play college or professional sports.

Let’s hope the Wells report will open professional sports teams’ eyes to mental health topics more seriously.

Artists, Get Paid for Your Work

Silvered Orange

Silvered Orange (Photo credit: cobalt123)

 

Good afternoon everyone!!

Today, I read through comments from the SCAD-Atlanta Facebook group, and I came across a video/blog post that a fellow student posted. It contains a video where character designer and teacher Stephen Silver speaks out against companies who don’t pay artists to come up with art or concepts for their products.

As a freelance writer, event photographer, and a lover of the arts & entertainment world, his message hits home to me because I’m also a starving artist trying to make a name for myself. I’ve seen plenty of opportunities where companies would allow you produce work for them, but only as an “internship” or no compensation. However, they promise you that the job can help you get exposure.

That is called cheap labor, a.k.a. slavery. Sorry, I don’t like cheap labor. I do free work because of causes and topics that I support, up and coming artists that I want to help succeed, and personal favors. But even then, I’ll get something in return, like a gig or reference. I also write for free because I want to promote MY artwork under MY rules, preparing myself for bigger and paid opportunities.

If you do want to work for free, do it for a right cause or at least find free work that can benefit you. But don’t fall under the trap of making content for companies who refuse to compensate you for your work and don’t care about what you create.

The video also taught me another thing: the importance of entrepreneurship. Sure, I can try to land jobs where I write and take pictures for a living. But is that all I want? What if I don’t get that dream job, and how else can I spread my love for media while getting paid? I starting to understand friends’ advice on offering event photography services for certain rates. Besides, in this world, you’ll gain more recognition once you do more paid work (especially if it’s freelance work).

I leave you with Silver’s spiel on providing paid services v.s. working for cheap labor. Otherwise, enjoy your day and let’s break the starving artist myth.

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Happy Valentine’s and Single Awareness Day

VDay2014

 

Good evening everyone!! Hope you all having a great Valentine’s and Single Awareness Day. Remember, it’s another example to love up on people, whether you’re single, married, or in a relationship. Give all the love and kindness you can give today, and everyday.

Love,

T.J. a.k.a. Pharaoh, Timmy-kun, Tim, Lil’ Tim…whatever you wanna call me! lol

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Happy (Belated) International Day of Acceptance to Derrick Coleman

Monday was not only the American observance of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday, it was also the day for disability acceptance, called International Day of Acceptance (IDOA). On that day, and any other day, we appreciate the talents of those with disabilities. Some have even influenced multitudes of peoples.

What grander example of a person overcoming obstacles to showcase talents than Derrick Coleman of the Seattle Seahawks. Not only he’s their fullback, but he’s also the first legally deaf offensive player to be on an NFL team. And he’s going to the Super Bowl with the Seahawks in about one week from Sunday! Now that’s an amazing accomplishment from someone who became deaf at 3 years old, went on to star at UCLA, and made an NFL regular roster after going undrafted. If you don’t consider him an example of MLK’s dream and Anne Hopkins’ vision of IDOA, then I don’t know what else to tell you.

Check out his Duracell commercial and many of his interviews below, then share this post to all who believes in going above and beyond expectations.